dietetics

FNCE Swag- My Favorite Items

I have been in Chicago this past week attending the Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo (FNCE). It is the annual conference for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. This year was my first time attending FNCE. Overall it was a great experience. I learned some new things that I am excited to put in to practice and tried a bunch of new products. Below is a review of my favorite items I received from the expo.

1. U of A Nutritional Sciences tote bag

The University of Arizona had a booth at FNCE  promoting their Nutritional Science program; the program I received my Bachelors of Science in. #Beardown.

2. Hemp Hearts

Hemp seeds are a favorite of mine to top yogurt, salads, and ice cream with. They are a great plant based source of omega-3s and protein, they’re also a good source of fiber.

3. Scharffen Berger Dark Chocolates

Good quality dark chocolate, enough said.

4. Sun-Maid Sour Watermelon Raisins

My favorite candy is sour patch kids, but I rarely eat them because they are so sugary. These raisins satisfy my taste buds because they are sour and sweet and the best part is they contain no added sugar! Watermelon is a new flavor coming out soon, they are currently available in Sour Lemon and Sour Strawberry.

5.  Rhythm Beet Chips and Kale Seeds

I love snacks like these beet chips, because the only ingredient is beets! They are baked, not fried and incredibly tasty. I also like they they gave out seeds to grow your own kale.

6. Sunsweet Prunes

Prunes made it to my favorites list after going to an educational session on prunes ability to inhibit bone resorption! Bone resorption is when bone is broken down and the minerals are released int o the blood stream, which can lead to osteoporosis. Research suggests eating 100 grams (about 12 prunes) per day for 6 months to 1 year can increase bone density in men and women. Prunes can also preserve bond density, subjects were tested 5 years after the intervention of 100gm prunes/d; subjects did not continue to eat prunes in the 5 year period.

7. Crazy Richard’s Powdered Peanut Butter and Nut Butter Mixing Spatula

 I am definitely a fan of powdered peanut butter, except most brands add sugar, but not Crazy Richard’s! They’re 100% Peanut Powder only has 1 ingredient, peanuts. The PB plus has added B vitamins and antioxidants designed for physically active individuals. They were also giving out a handy spatula to stir nut butter. It works so much better than a knife when mixing a newly opened jar of nut butter!

8. Nuts-Almonds, Walnuts, Pistachios

Nuts are one of my go to snacks because they contain fat, protein, and fiber. 3 things guaranteed to get you to your next meal without feeling famished.

9. That’s it bars

These bars are another great on the go snack with a small ingredient list and a good source of fiber!

10.  GoMacro bar

I have seen these bars at Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, and Sprouts, but never tried them before. As far as bars go their nutritional stats are not bad, they taste pretty good, and have a chewy/crispy texture. They are also coming out with some new fruit and nut bars.

11. Vital Protein Collagen Peptides and Bone Broth Collagen

 I love, love, love collagen! I’ve been taking the collagen peptides for a few months now and I’m hooked. I have noticed that my hair grows faster and it helped me heal from a ligament strain. I’ve been told that my skin looks firmer too! I bought a container of the bone broth collagen and look forward to incorporating it in to my diet. These stick packs are great for traveling.

 

Mini Eggplant Pizza

I don’t know if it’s related to being a foodie or a dietitian, but I love cute food! (This even extends to non-food items that look like food.) When I saw this recipe for mini eggplant pizzas I had to try it I like this recipe because you can get creative with the toppings.

Ingredients

1 large eggplant (or 2 medium)

1/3 cup olive oil

salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 1/4 cups marinara sauce (I ended up using bruschetta sauce)

1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese (I made a few using chev goat cheese)

1/2 cup torn basil leaves

Method

1. Preheat oven to 400°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. Cut the ends off the eggplant(s) and then cut into 3/4 inch-thick slices. Arrange the slices on the prepared baking sheets and brush both sides of each slice with olive oil. Season with salt and pepper.

3. Roast the eggplant slices until nearly tender, 10-12 minutes.

4. Remove baking sheets from the oven and spread 2 tablespoons of sauce on top of each piece. Top generously with cheese.

 

5. Return the pizzas to the oven and roast until the cheese is melted, 5-7 minutes more.

6. Serve the pizzas hot, garnished with basil.

Spicy Whole Roasted Cauliflower

I feel like cauliflower is often overlooked because it doesn’t have a distinct flavor. I think this is a reason to love it because it can take on other flavors so well. I saw this recipe from Pure Wow a while ago and finally got around to making it.

I did not have all the ingredients in the original recipe, below is what I did.

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Ingredients

1 head cauliflower

1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt

1/2 lemon, zested and juiced

2 tsp chile powder

2 cloves fresh garlic, minced

1 tsp curry powder

1/2 tsp Himalayan salt

1 tsp black pepper

Method

1.Preheat oven to 400°F and line a baking sheet with foil. Remove any green leaves and stem from cauliflower.

2. In a small bowl combine yogurt, lemon zest and juice, chile powder, garlic, curry powder, salt, and pepper.

3. With cauliflower on baking sheet cover with yogurt mixture, evenly over entire surface.

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4. Roast cauliflower for 30-40 minutes, until surface is dry and lightly browned. The yogurt will form a crust in the cauliflower.

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5. Let cauliflower cool for 10 minutes before cutting in to wedges and serving.

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Dietitian vs. Nutritionist: What’s the Difference?

I have been MIA from blogging because I have been completing a dietetic internship. This internship is one distinguishing feature between a Registered Dietitian and a Nutritionist. These terms are often used interchangeably and incorrectly. The purpose of this post is to clarify the differences.

Registered Dietitian

  • Undergraduate degree usually in nutrition
    • Many also have masters degrees
  • Completion of an internship
    • 1200 hours of supervised practice
  • Must pass national registry exam
    • Maintain registered status with continued education throughout career
  • National standards for professional legislation
    • The title of dietitian is protected by law
  • Experts in food and nutrition
  • Credentials RD (Registered Dietitian) or RDN (Registered Dietitian Nutritionist)

Nutritionist

  • Undergraduate and/or graduate degree in nutrition
    • Some do not have degrees
  • In most states anyone can all themselves a nutritionist regardless of education and training
    • States with licensing requirements- Alabama, Alaska, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, and Maine.
  • Non-accredited title; not protected by law

When you need nutrition or nutrition related health information seek a registered dietitian, because they are experts in their field and they have completed the necessary education and training. If you are going to work with a nutritionist do your research to be sure they are a reliable source of information.

I have a few months left in my internship and I am excited to get my credentials and begin my career as a registered dietitian. I am also excited that I will have more time to blog, as I have many topics I want to discuss and recipes to make and share.

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Yogurt Buttons

Yogurt buttons are a cool and refreshing treat during the hot summer months. I like this recipe because it is versatile, quick, and easy.

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Ingredients

1 cup Plain Greek Yogurt

1/2 cup Fresh Fruit (I used mango)

1 tablespoon Fresh Lime Juice

Method

1. Puree yogurt, fruit, and lime juice using a blender, food processor, or an immersion blender.

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2. Pour mixture in to a ziplock bag and cut off the corner. The yogurt mixture will begin to pour out once you cut the corner, have your cookie sheet ready.

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3. Squeeze quarter sized dots on to a baking sheet lined with parchment or wax paper.

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4. Freeze until ready to eat.

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Other Considerations

  • Use any fruit you like
  • For more fruit flavor use 3/4 cups of fruit
  • For more sweetness use orange juice instead of lime juice

Eat The Rainbow

To get all the vitamins and minerals your body needs it is important to eat a balanced diet and have variety within that balanced diet. Variety is important because different fruits and vegetables provide different nutrients.

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Red

  • Nutrients: lycopene and antioxidants
  • Properties: Anti-inflammatory, reduce the risk of cancer, and heart health
  • Foods: Tomatoes, strawberries, red bell peppers, cherries, raspberries, watermelon,  pomegranates, and goji berries

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Orange/Yellow

  • Nutrients: Beta carotine, vitamin C, vitamin B6, and potassium
  • Properties: Anti-inflammatory, antioxidants, eye health, immune function, skin health, heart health, and cancer prevention
  • Foods: Oranges, lemons, carrots, bananas, butternut squash, mango, apricots, nectarines, pumpkin, summer squash, sweet potato, pineapple, orange and yellow bell peppers, and cantaloupe

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Green

  • Nutrients: Lutein, indoles, folate, and vitamin K
  • Properties: Eye health, cancer prevention, cell regeneration, anit-inflammatory, heart health, skin health
  • Foods: Spinach, kale, asparagus, cabbage, broccoli, kiwi, honeydew, green beans, artichoke, Brussels sprouts, celery, cucumbers, swiss chard, and avocado

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Blue/Purple

  • Nutrients: Antioxidants and Anthocyanins
  • Properties: Anti-inflammatory, cancer prevention, and cognitive health
  • Foods: Eggplant, red grapes, blackberries, blueberries, purple potatoes, plumbs, cabbage, red onions, and figs

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White

  • Nutrients: Antioxidants and potassium
  • Properties: Anti-inflammatory, cancer prevention, and heart health
  • Foods: Cauliflower, parsnips, potatoes, leeks, onions, garlic, mushrooms, shallots, and coconut  

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Last Updated: 04/06/2011

Serving Size…What’s That?

The information is out there to get 3 servings of dairy/day, 6-11 servings of grains,  to eat 5 day, or to fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables. What does all this mean? What constitutes a serving?

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Fruit: 2 servings/day (generally)

1 serving=1 cup of fresh, frozen, or canned, 1/2 cup dried, or 1 cup of 100% juice.

Fruits provide folate, vitamins A and C, potassium, and fiber.

Examples: Apple, apricot, avocado, banana, blueberries, cherries, grapefruit, grapes, honeydew, kiwi, mango, nectarine, orange, papaya, peach, pear, pineapple, plumb, raspberries, strawberries, tangerine, and watermelon.

Vegetables: 3-5 servings/day

1 serving= 1 cup raw or cooked, 1 cup 100% juice, 1 cup cooked legumes, or 2 cups raw, leafy greens

Vegetables provide folate, vitamins A, C, K, and E, magnesium , potassium, and fiber.

Examples: artichoke, asparagus, legumes (black beans, chickpeas, kidney beans, lentils, soy beans, white beans) beets, bell peppers, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cassava, cauliflower, celery, cucumber, eggplant, green beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, squash,  zucchini, and leafy greens: kale, chard, arugula, spinach, romaine lettuce.

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Grains: 6-11 servings/day

1 serving=1 oz 1 slice of bread, 1/2 cup cooked rice, pasta, or cereal, 1 oz dry pasta or rice, 1 cup ready to eat cereal, or 3 c popped popcorn.

Grains provide folate, niacin, riboflavin, thiamin, iron, magnesium, selenium, and fiber. Choose whole grains, which contain more nutrients, opposed to refined grains.

Examples: Amarath, barley, brown rice, buckwheat, bulgur, millet, oats, quinoa, rye, wheat, sweet potato, potato ,peas, and corn.

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Protein: 2-3 servings/day

1 serving= 3 oz lean meat, poultry, or seafood, 1 egg, 1/4 cup cooked legumes or tofu, 1 Tbs peanut butter, and 1/2 oz nuts or seeds.

Protein foods provides protein,  essential fatty acids, niacin, thiamin, vitamin B6 and B12, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc.

Examples: Seafood (tuna, halibut, salmon, mackerel, tilapia, shrimp, crab, lobster), lean meats (poultry, beef, lamb, pork), eggs, legumes (black beans, chickpeas, kidney beans, lentils, soy beans, white beans), nuts/nut butters (almonds, cashews, walnuts, pistachios, peanuts), and seeds (flax, chia, sunflower, sesame, pumpkin).

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Dairy: 3 servings/day

1 serving=1 cup of milk, yogurt, fortified soy milk, and 1-1/2 oz natural cheese.

Dairy products contribute protein, riboflavin, vitamin B12, calcium, potassium, and when fortified vitamin A and D.

Examples: Milk, cheese, yogurt, cottage cheese, fortified soy, almond, or coconut milk.

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Oils: This is not a food group, however it is good to keep serving size in mind.

1 serving=1 teaspoon oil, 1 tablespoon low fat mayonnaise, or 2 tablespoons light salad dressing.

Oils contribute vitamin E and essential fatty acids.

Examples: Fatty fish, nuts, olives, seeds, canola, corn, flaxseed, olive, peanut, safflower, sesame, soy bean, sunflower, avocado, and coconut oils.

Black Lentil Soup

Compared to their traditional counterparts black lentils are tiny spherical black legumes also known as beluga lentils because they look like caviar. Due to their smaller size they cook quicker and make a great side dish, salad addition, or soup. I like this soup because the spices make it a warming dish, great for chilly winter weather.

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Ingredients

1 cup Black Lentils

1-1 inch piece of fresh Ginger, peeled and thinly sliced, plus 2 Tbs minced

3 Tbs Unsalted Butter

1 medium Onion, diced

2 cloves Garlic, minced

1/2 Tsp ground Coriander

1/2 Tsp ground Cumin

1/4 Tsp Cayenne Pepper

1/4 Tsp Gram Masala

2 quarts Low Sodium Chicken Stock

1 cup Crushed Tomatoes

Salt to taste

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Method

1. In a medium pot cover lentils and sliced ginger with 1 inch of water. Bring to a boil and cook over medium heat until lentils soften, about 10 minutes.

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2. Drain lentils and set aside, discard sliced ginger.

3. Melt 3 tablespoons of butter in the pot. Add onion, garlic, and minced ginger. Cook over medium heat until softened, about 8 minutes.

4. Reduce heat to low and add spices, cook stirring, until fragrant about 4 minutes.

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5. Add stock, tomatoes, and lentils bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat and simmer until lentils soften further and soup has thickened, about 1 hour. Season with salt portion in to bowls and serve.

 

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Considerations

  • Make this soup vegan buy using vegetable stock and olive oil or coconut oil instead of butter.
  • Top soup with avocado, which adds richness to the final product.
  • Add chopped kale or spinach just before serving.

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Goji Quinoa Overnight Oats

Are you tired of your usual oatmeal with brown sugar and cinnamon for breakfast? Try this version that incorporates different flavors and textures to start you day in a nutritious way!

Ingredients

3/4 cup Dried Goji Berries

1/2 cup Steel Cut Oats

1/2 cup Quinoa

1 tsp Salt

1 tsp Cinnamon

Drizzle of Honey (optional)

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Method

1. In a medium sauce pan bring goji berries, oats, quinoa, salt, cinnamon, and 4 cups of water to a boil.

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2. Cover and let sit off heat overnight.

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3. In the morning reheat, stirring occasionally and add water if needed, until warm. About 5-8 minutes.

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4. Serve. I Like to sprinkle pepitas, chia seeds, or chopped almonds on top and finish with a drizzle of honey.

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Considerations

Any type of dried fruit, or a mixture or dried fruits can be used.

This can also be served with milk, honey, or maple syrup.

Alternatively this can be made by bringing the mixture to a boil, reducing the heat and simmering for 20-25 minutes, stirring occasionally until grains are tender.

This recipe is adapted from one featured in Bon Appetite.

Snack Time

Snack time is as important as breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Snacks are something to keep you satisfied until your next meal. The composition of your snack is important because you want to avoid low blood sugar and feeling hungry. For example eating an apple and 1 oz of almonds is a good snack. It has carbohydrates to maintain blood sugar levels plus fat, protein, and fiber for satiation.

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Another great option for a snack is fruit/vegetable juice and chia seeds. The juice provides the carbohydrate and the chia seeds provide healthy fats, protein and fiber. You can also add avocado to vegetable juice, in stead of chia seeds for fat and fiber. Or to make this snack more hearty/satisfying try adding protein powder. Because it is a snack I would only add 10-15 gms of protein.

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One of my favorite snacks when I’m craving something sweet is non-fat cottage cheese sprinkled with pistachios and drizzled with honey. Again there is the combination of carbohydrate, fat, and protein. This snack will satisfy your sweet tooth so you don’t reach for the cookies.

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